c

1992 -n/a

c

1987 -n/a

c

1984-1990

1989 -n/a

c

1989 -n/a

c

1989 -n/a

c

1989 -n/a

 

riet

2006 - n/a

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Working with light and porcelain


Light, I think has to do with sensibility for shades, reflections, dark, contrast.
For me not so much bright sunlight (I come from a low country with lots of clouds and hazy views. lots of grey-tones)
It may have something to do with the fact that Dutch painters through the ages were known for their specific light in the paintings. My senses are very sensitive and so I do enjoy shades of grey, depth in colour and moisture in the air, changing perceptions...

Maybe it is that, being in a country where light is not 'always' around, makes one sensitive for when it is...

Light and porcelain. They are interconnected. Translucency.
Extremely exciting.
You can see through the wall.
I think I became aware when visiting (as student) the Mausoleum of Galla Placidia in Ravenna, Italy.
The windows in that place were exclusively made out of alabaster. The light in that burial place was i n c r e a d i b l e... So mysterious, so... holy(?)
Porcelain has similar qualities, it does similar things to me when I look at well made translucent porcelain. One of my dreams has always been to be allowed to make porcelain-in-lead windows....

 

 

 

Contemporary ceramic sculpture is often quite small. It suggests an intimacy and preciousness that most fine art no longer has therefore it is possible to argue that work like Bechtold's is an art of private negotiation between one artist and an individual purchaser or collector - rather than one aimed at a public audience. The individual purchaser, attracted to the ceramic work, hears the story that accompanies it and takes both text and object away as a minor art work for his or her private contemplation and pleasure"

Taken from: The New Ceramics 1994 by Peter Dormer